MRSA Killer Now Affecting Gay Populations

FOXNews points to a San Francisco Chronicle report saying that a new strain of the MRSA bacteria is spreading in the gay population.  The two reports are found here and here.

The report in the San Francisco Chronicle cites reports that a particularly nasty strain of the methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) labeled USA300 is making the rounds.  The distinctive of this strain of MRSA is that it is "an epidemic clone of community- acquired" MRSA.  In other words, it is communicable via skin-to-skin contact AND it is spreading in concentrations among a specific community. 

My own interest in MRSA is that my friend's sister recently died of complications with MRSA and we learned at that time it was communicable.  MRSA use to be common primarily in hospital populations and it a known killer.  It has developed a strain (USA300) that is frequently displaying in sexually transmitted situations and, specifically, it is 13% more common in gay populations in major cities.

Here is one link to a CDC report that was published in August 2007.

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7 thoughts on “MRSA Killer Now Affecting Gay Populations

  1. Here is one link to a CDC report that was published this week.
    "It is important to note that the groups of MSM (men who have sex with men) in which these isolates have been described are not representative of all MSM, so conclusions can not be drawn about the prevalence of these strains among all MSM."
    The CDC issued this clarification after it was immediately picked up by mainstream news media and seized upon by right-wing religious groups as the latest threat to the general population from the gay community. You know the type… homophobic and looking to paint gay men as filthy carriers of infectious disease, who have too much sex.
    God bless.

  2. Thanks you for stopping in and for your contribution. Obviously true is that all men who have sex with men are NOT carrying the MRSA-USA300 strain. The CDC recommendations are somewhat universal precautions and, otherwise, good practice. While anyone could contract MRSA, the report is of significance in that it is tracing the infection's increased growth in specific populations. In this case, it is growing in San Francisco and in New York City. For the record, I don't believe that God has targeted gay men for annihilation via MRSA or any other particular means that the hand-wringers and or right-wingers talk about. Still, at a time that the gay community is finding freedoms and a voice never before experienced, some in the gay community (and anyone else in an open relationship for that matter) would do well to remember that some of these practices are very dangerous and can introduce those involved to horrible disease.

  3. I've been in Emergency Medical Services for 9 years…
    Over that time I've had over 1000 patients with MRSA…geez, 3 of my patients today had it.
    90 percent of those cases… it's concentrated in the sputum…(airborne droplets and such)…
    The rest was transmitted through some other bodily fluid, usually the urine.
    How I've avoided it: simple – gloves and a gown to protect myself.
    How I avoid it when I'm off duty… chronic handwashing after shaking hands and things of that nature…(no sink? purell and antiseptic towellettes) and simply put… don't touch me, kiss me, or anything if you're not my husband or child…
    When I come home from being out, whether it be work or just to goto the store, the outside clothes come off right away and chucked into dirty laundry. I have my separate out clothes and house clothes.
    MRSA loves to target the weaker immune systems. Yes, it's growing in severity and in transmission… but honestly, if you just live like an EMS worker….(thinking everyone and everything is diseased)…you'll be fairly 'safe'….it may sound sad but hey I've got a little one to worry about, and I've always been cautious about 'bringing home' something to my family.

  4. MRSA… scary stuff. I remember when the training videos for work first started to come out when it was still mostly confined to hospitals and nursing homes. It was predicted to hit the general population. And so it has, apparently.

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